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100days of guitar day 29

I've started reading The Practice of Practice and the first main point of the book is don't make mistakes, because as you make mistakes your brain learns those mistakes as the correct way to do something.

When great musicians practice, they go slowly enough that errors are avoided. When an error does crop up, expert practicers fix those errors immediately. That’s the strategy: fixing a mistake immediately. Anybody can do it, and anybody who adopts that strategy will get better faster than those who don’t.

If you flub a passage the same place every time and don’t take measures in your practice to fix it immediately (or better yet, go slowly enough to avoid the mistake in the first place), the myelin will blithely coat the neurons, reinforcing the actions that result in the mistake.

Errors come in many flavors, not only the easily detected kinds like flubbed notes—known to musicians as clams—but more subtle mistakes, too, like not being in tune, unclear articulations, stylistic inaccuracies, poor tone quality, or problems with any other musical element, like rhythm or timbre. It’s kind of an endless list. That’s one of the reasons it takes a long time to be able to perceive all of them, or at least most of them.

The overall message, is to practice as slow as you need to too be able to play perfectly.

What is Practice?

Practicing isn't just playing the same song over and over till you get better.
There are many other ways to train your brain to be better at music:

Updating my practice

Based on what I've read already, I've upped my game on my practice. I've recorded the entire lecture from Guitareo on the song I'm learning into Ableton. (I use https://github.com/mattingalls/Soundflower to easily record from macos output to Ableton input). Then I broke each lick into it's own loopable section and added a click in track and a drum track to play along with. Now I can hear exactly what the song should sound like as I'm practicing it, and make sure the tone, and timing are correct.

I've also setup a binder of reference material to make it easier to have reference up when I need it. I already had it in Obsidian, but it seems a little easier to be able to just have a printed copy in front of me.

Also, now that I'm in Ableton, I can try another idea I had of recording my play/jam session so I can come back and clip out the parts I like and merge them back together as songs to play with. (is musicbashing a thing like photobashing?)

I guess I have a new thing to investigate, musicbashing, taking bits and parts of many songs to put together a Franken-song that then can be refined into an original song.

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